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    River Ridge Taiko

    Questions & Answers


     
     
     
    "Taiko" is a Japanese word that essentially translates into "drum". A taiko ensemble is simply a Japanese drumming ensemble. in the early history of Taiko in Japan, the drums were used for military purposes and in court music. It wasn't until the 1950's that the word "Taiko" took on its modern notions of movement with the music.
     

    For more information, check out:

     
     
     
     
    River Ridge High School is a perfect place for a taiko ensemble. We have a very strong Japanese language program within the school and a very diverse student population. Before starting this ensemble, interest was very high in the existing taiko drum that was built for a piece of concert music that the band performed in the 2007-2008 school year. One thing lead to another and we found ourselves very interested in forming a taiko ensemble at RRHS.
     
     
     
    That depends on the type of taiko drum being built.  The "tacked" taiko (Odaiko, Hira, and Chu) are all built in a similar manner:
    • Start with a wine barrel of the appropriate size and clean it out after removing the ends.
    • De-hoop and glue the barrel together.
    • Trim the barrel to the appropriate size.
    • Create and install the rim inserts.
    • Shape the rim inserts.
    • Sand the body down and fine-shape the rims.
    • Stain the body.
    • Clear-coat the body.
    • Make and install the handles.
    • Prepare the heads.
    • Skin the drum

    This process can take anywhere from 2 to 4 months, depending on how much time you have to work on the drums.


    The "roped" taiko (Okedo and Shime) are both built in a similar manner:

    • Start with flat wood (cedar for the Okedo, ash or other hardwood for the Shime).
    • Cut the wood down to an appropriate length and angles.
    • Glue the wood together to form the body.
    • Create and install the rim inserts.
    • Shape the rim inserts.
    • Sand the body down and fine-shape the rims.
    • Stain the body.
    • Clear-coat the body.
    • Prepare the heads, sewing them onto the steel rings.
    • Attach the heads using rope to tension them onto the body of the drum.

    Because the skinning time is a lot less than the tacked drums, the roped drums can be built much more quickly...in as little as a month.

     
     
     
     
     
Last Modified on July 11, 2011