Math - Stepping Stones

  • Stepping Stones We use the Stepping Stones cirriculum for math. 

    Please visit our Recommended Resources page for online math games to practice what you learn!

Module 1

  • This module of math third graders will begin by working on place value within the thousands.

    We will then move onto introducing multiplication to students using picture models and picture models and arrays. We will be focusing on our 5's and 10's facts within multiplication.

    Ideas for Home

    • Look for groups of five and ten in your home, at the store, and around your neighborhood.
    • As your child to solve real-world problems, such as, "If there are 4 people in our family, and each person east 5 apples a week, then how many apples do we need to buy at the grocery store?" Remember to ask them to explain how they know.

Module 2

  • Module two in Stepping Stones starts off with addition of two and three digit numbers. We will be looking at patterns, and finding ways to compose numbers.

    From there we will move into telling time, and finding elapsed time. This is always a tricky concept, so practice at home would be beneficial! We will finish the module off by looking at quadrilaterals.

    Ideas for Home

    • Practice counting with your child by twos, fives, and tens to recognize and find number patterns. For an extra challenge, try counting by threes, sevens, and nines.

Module 3

  • Module three circles back to multiplication. In this module students will work with multiplying by 2's and 4's. They will be introduced to doubling for their 2's and double doubling for their 4's.

    After we are finished with multiplication, we will move onto comparing and rounding two and three digit numbers. One way to practice this at home is to have your student read these numbers aloud to you each time you see them.

    Ideas for Home

    • Connects twos facts to familiar situation. E.g. two hands show 2 x 5 = 10 (or, double 5 is 10); an egg carton shows 2 x 6 = 12 (or, double 6 is 12), and two weeks on a calendar shows 2 x 7 = 14. Extend to fours facts by asking, "How many days are there is 4 weeks?"
    • Practice the twos and fours doubling facts. E.g. ask, "What is 4 x 7?" When they answer, "28," ask your child to explain using the double strategy. E.g. "I know that double 7 is 14 and double 14 is 28, so 4 x7 is 28."
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